D’OH!

Ta much, TheMadMinstrel!

odditiesoflife:

The Abandoned Ghost Mansion of Villa de Vecchi

Ghosts, apparitions, piano sounds, unexplained lights, fountains of blood and satanic rituals — all rumors of the now famous “haunted mansion” in the village of Bindo in Cortenova, Italy. Yet Villa de Vecchi has all the trappings to live up to its image: an eery beauty, desolate location, abandoned for 75 years, and filled with the energy of a tragic past.

Villa de Vecchi is a beautiful abandoned Baroque villa in the moutains near Lake Como. A favorite locale for urban exploration and photography, it was once a grand mansion built by a nobleman.In the mid 19th century, Count Felix de Vecchi chose architect Alessandro Sidoli to design his home. Sidoli integrated the latest technologies, including running water and heating pipes. The villa was adorned with incredible frescoes and featured a grand piano in the hall.

According to local lore, Count de Vecchi allegedly returned home to find that his wife had been murdered and his daughter was missing. With no trace of her in sight, he spent months searching to no avail. Distraught and alone, de Vecchi committed suicide In 1862.

The mansion passed on to de Vecchi’s brother whose family spent summers there through the 1940s. Eventually the home was deserted and became known as the Ghost Mansion, an abandoned mansion with a chilling history and a haunted reputation. While an effort is underway to save the historic villa, its future remains uncertain.

sources 1, 2, 3, 4; photos by Jeff Kerwin

Protesters trying to set up Occupy-style camp in front of St Peter’s removed with the support of the Holy See

…  “We put our faith in the Vatican but no one helped us,” Julian Garcia, one of the group, told Corriere della Sera. “We were sitting on the ground and they were hitting us with batons.”  …

 (via Vatican protesters evicted by police | World news | The Guardian)

Protesters trying to set up Occupy-style camp in front of St Peter’s removed with the support of the Holy See

… “We put our faith in the Vatican but no one helped us,” Julian Garcia, one of the group, told Corriere della Sera. “We were sitting on the ground and they were hitting us with batons.” …

(via Vatican protesters evicted by police | World news | The Guardian)

Mario Monti, the former European commissioner, has been sworn in as Italy’s prime minister along with the ministers of his new, technocratic government, charged with steering the eurozone’s most indebted nation out of danger.

The 17-strong cabinet will be able to bring to bear on Italy’s daunting problems a formidable amount of intellectual fire-power. More than a third of the seats in the cabinet will be occupied by professors, including the prime minister himself. Monti, a distinguished liberal economist, kept the finance and economics portfolios. He handed the economic development and infrastructure portfolios to Corrado Passera, the chief executive of Italy’s biggest retail bank, Intesa Sanpaolo.

Three of the cabinet ministers are women, and two were appointed to top jobs: Anna Maria Cancellieri as interior minister and Paola Severino as justice minister. Elsa Fornero will have heavy responsibilities as minister for welfare and employment.

Speaking after announcing his cabinet, Monti said: “We feel sure of what we have done and we have received many signals of encouragement from our European partners and the international world. All this will, I trust, translate into a calming of that part of the market difficulty which concerns our country.”

The new government took office at a time when Italy was engulfed by the eurozone crisis, with its benchmark borrowing costs at an unsustainably high level of more than 7%. The swearing in of the new government made little difference to sovereign yields but it appeared to cheer the Milan bourse which closed almost 0.8% up on a day that saw Frankfurt and London lose ground. …

Italy was preparing for life without Silvio Berlusconi after a historic vote paved the way for a new government in Rome tasked with shoring up the country’s economy and taking it off the frontline in the eurozone crisis.

The 75-year-old billionaire looked set to bring down the curtain on a government that has played a significant role in taking his country, the European single currency and the global economy to the brink of catastrophe. The dramatic end of Berlusconi’s 17-year domination of Italian politics came as the lower house of parliament approved a package of savage cuts and stimulus measures demanded by the European Union to trim Italy’s massive €1.9 trillion debt.

After losing his majority in the house, a weakened Berlusconi had pledged to resign as soon as he had pushed the reform package through parliament in record time. The reforms were passed by 380 votes to 26. Opposition parties did not participate.

The package was passed as José Manuel Barroso, president of the European commission, issued a sharp rebuke to eurosceptics in the UK who want to use the current crisis to disengage from the European Union. Writing in the Observer, he said all members of the EU need to unite and “advance together”. …

… “They can say about me that I screw. It’s the only thing they can say about me. Is that clear?” he said to the man allegedly blackmailing him. “They can put listening devices where they like. They can tap my telephone calls. I don’t give a fuck. I … In a few months, I’m getting out to mind my own fucking business, from somewhere else, and so I’m leaving this shitty country of which I’m sickened.” …

Alberobello, Italy

 (Via http://www.kerkythea.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=2153&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0&sid=ee816d3a98f2344398f38895b2967e94)
Alberobello, Italy

 (Via http://thisfabtrek.com/journey/europe/italy/20070612-reggio.php)
Alberobello, Italy

 (Via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alberobello_Trulli.jpg)
Alberobello, Italy

 (Via http://www.italyluxurytours.com/tours/apulia.htm)
Alberobello, Italy

Alberobello, Italy

Alberobello, Italy

 (Via http://www.panoramio.com/photo/2220822)

Alberobello, Italy

 (Via http://www.panoramio.com/photo/2220822)