Via Zippy the Pinhead

It was more sophisticated than we had imagined: new documents show that the violent crackdown on Occupy last fall – so mystifying at the time – was not just coordinated at the level of the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, and local police. The crackdown, which involved, as you may recall, violent arrests, group disruption, canister missiles to the skulls of protesters, people held in handcuffs so tight they were injured, people held in bondage till they were forced to wet or soil themselves –was coordinated with the big banks themselves.

The Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, in a groundbreaking scoop that should once more shame major US media outlets (why are nonprofits now some of the only entities in America left breaking major civil liberties news?), filed this request. The document – reproduced here in an easily searchable format – shows a terrifying network of coordinated DHS, FBI, police, regional fusion center, and private-sector activity so completely merged into one another that the monstrous whole is, in fact, one entity: in some cases, bearing a single name, the Domestic Security Alliance Council. And it reveals this merged entity to have one centrally planned, locally executed mission. The documents, in short, show the cops and DHS working for and with banks to target, arrest, and politically disable peaceful American citizens.

The documents, released after long delay in the week between Christmas and New Year, show a nationwide meta-plot unfolding in city after city in an Orwellian world: six American universities are sites where campus police funneled information about students involved with OWS to the FBI, with the administrations’ knowledge (p51); banks sat down with FBI officials to pool information about OWS protesters harvested by private security; plans to crush Occupy events, planned for a month down the road, were made by the FBI – and offered to the representatives of the same organizations that the protests would target; and even threats of the assassination of OWS leaders by sniper fire – by whom? Where? – now remain redacted and undisclosed to those American citizens in danger, contrary to standard FBI practice to inform the person concerned when there is a threat against a political leader (p61).

As Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, executive director of the PCJF, put it, the documents show that from the start, the FBI – though it acknowledges Occupy movement as being, in fact, a peaceful organization – nonetheless designated OWS repeatedly as a “terrorist threat”:

“FBI documents just obtained by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund (PCJF) … reveal that from its inception, the FBI treated the Occupy movement as a potential criminal and terrorist threat … The PCJF has obtained heavily redacted documents showing that FBI offices and agents around the country were in high gear conducting surveillance against the movement even as early as August 2011, a month prior to the establishment of the OWS encampment in Zuccotti Park and other Occupy actions around the country.” …

1. Corrections Corporation of America
Headquarters: Nashville, TN…

2. Exxon
Headquarters: Irving, TX…

3. General Electric
Headquarters: Fairfield, CT…

4. Monsanto
Headquarters: St. Louis, MO…

5. Bank of America
Headquarters: Charlotte, NC…

6. Walmart
Headquarters: Bentonville, Ark….

Protesters trying to set up Occupy-style camp in front of St Peter’s removed with the support of the Holy See

…  “We put our faith in the Vatican but no one helped us,” Julian Garcia, one of the group, told Corriere della Sera. “We were sitting on the ground and they were hitting us with batons.”  …

 (via Vatican protesters evicted by police | World news | The Guardian)

Protesters trying to set up Occupy-style camp in front of St Peter’s removed with the support of the Holy See

… “We put our faith in the Vatican but no one helped us,” Julian Garcia, one of the group, told Corriere della Sera. “We were sitting on the ground and they were hitting us with batons.” …

(via Vatican protesters evicted by police | World news | The Guardian)

A notice sent out to businesses in the City of London has listed the protest movement among groups such as al-Qaida and Farc

 (via Occupy London’s anger over police ‘terrorism’ document | UK news | guardian.co.uk)

A notice sent out to businesses in the City of London has listed the protest movement among groups such as al-Qaida and Farc

(via Occupy London’s anger over police ‘terrorism’ document | UK news | guardian.co.uk)

US citizens of all political persuasions are still reeling from images of unparallelled police brutality in a coordinated crackdown against peaceful OWS protesters in cities across the nation this past week. An elderly woman was pepper-sprayed in the face; the scene of unresisting, supine students at UC Davis being pepper-sprayed by phalanxes of riot police went viral online; images proliferated of young women – targeted seemingly for their gender – screaming, dragged by the hair by police in riot gear; and the pictures of a young man, stunned and bleeding profusely from the head, emerged in the record of the middle-of-the-night clearing of Zuccotti Park.

But just when Americans thought we had the picture – was this crazy police and mayoral overkill, on a municipal level, in many different cities? – the picture darkened. The National Union of Journalists and the Committee to Protect Journalists issued a Freedom of Information Act request to investigate possible federal involvement with law enforcement practices that appeared to target journalists. The New York Times reported that “New York cops have arrested, punched, whacked, shoved to the ground and tossed a barrier at reporters and photographers” covering protests. Reporters were asked by NYPD to raise their hands to prove they had credentials: when many dutifully did so, they were taken, upon threat of arrest, away from the story they were covering, and penned far from the site in which the news was unfolding. Other reporters wearing press passes were arrested and roughed up by cops, after being – falsely – informed by police that “It is illegal to take pictures on the sidewalk.”

In New York, a state supreme court justice and a New York City council member were beaten up; in Berkeley, California, one of our greatest national poets, Robert Hass, was beaten with batons. The picture darkened still further when Wonkette and Washingtonsblog.com reported that the Mayor of Oakland acknowledged that the Department of Homeland Security had participated in an 18-city mayor conference call advising mayors on “how to suppress” Occupy protests. …


I feel physically ill.

They pulled me out by the stethoscope, white coat and all as I was telling them I have a patient in there. One girl has a heart condition and wasn’t feeling well. They manhandled her and threw her on the ground.

Occupy Wall Street medic PAUL KOSTORA, on being forced to leave Zuccotti Park by the NYPD.

The police don’t care about you and your God-damned healthcare.

(via the NY Daily News)

OK I’m going to reblog this again when there’s more people on, but I want to make this very clear:

AN ATTACK ON A CLEARLY MARKED MEDICAL FACILITY/SPACE IS A VIOLATION OF THE GENEVA CONVENTION. 

NYPD HAS COMMITTED CLEARLY DEFINED WAR CRIMES AGAINST US CITIZENS.

(via accordingtosami)

Occupy protests around the world: full list visualised

The Occupy protests have spread from Wall Street to London to Bogota. See the full list - and help us add more
• Get the data
• Interactive map

"951 cities in 82 countries" has become the standard definition of the scale of the Occupy protests around the world this weekend, following on from the Occupy Wall Street and Madrid demonstrations that have shaped public debate in the past month.

We wanted to list exactly where protests have taken place as part of the Occupy movement - and see exactly what is happening where around the globe.

As we wrote this week:

    Protests inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York and the “Indignants” in Spain have spread to cities around the world. Tens of thousands went on the march in New York, London, Frankfurt, Madrid, Rome, Sydney and Hong Kong as organisers aimed to “initiate global change” against capitalism and austerity measures. There were extraordinary scenes in New York where at least 10,000 protesters took their message from the outpost of Zuccotti Park into the heart of the city, thronging into Times Square.

So, we have started listing all the events [for which] we can find verified news reports. There [aren’t] 951 yet, but we do have most of the major ones….

Occupy protests around the world: full list visualised

The Occupy protests have spread from Wall Street to London to Bogota. See the full list - and help us add more
Get the data
Interactive map

"951 cities in 82 countries" has become the standard definition of the scale of the Occupy protests around the world this weekend, following on from the Occupy Wall Street and Madrid demonstrations that have shaped public debate in the past month.

We wanted to list exactly where protests have taken place as part of the Occupy movement - and see exactly what is happening where around the globe.

As we wrote this week:

Protests inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York and the “Indignants” in Spain have spread to cities around the world. Tens of thousands went on the march in New York, London, Frankfurt, Madrid, Rome, Sydney and Hong Kong as organisers aimed to “initiate global change” against capitalism and austerity measures. There were extraordinary scenes in New York where at least 10,000 protesters took their message from the outpost of Zuccotti Park into the heart of the city, thronging into Times Square.

So, we have started listing all the events [for which] we can find verified news reports. There [aren’t] 951 yet, but we do have most of the major ones….

Occupy protests mapped around the world

Simon Rogers
Tuesday 18 October 2011

Where are the Occupy protests taking place in the world after the camps in Wall Street and Madrid? See the full list of places we have found so far - and help us collect more• Explore the list - and help us add more
The map below shows events for which there is at least one independent verification, based on readers suggestions and Guardian research. It’s possible we’re missing details - go to the full list to add or change events


 Via http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/interactive/2011/oct/18/occupy-protests-map-world

Occupy protests mapped around the world

Simon Rogers
Tuesday 18 October 2011

Where are the Occupy protests taking place in the world after the camps in Wall Street and Madrid? See the full list of places we have found so far - and help us collect more
• Explore the list - and help us add more
The map below shows events for which there is at least one independent verification, based on readers suggestions and Guardian research. It’s possible we’re missing details - go to the full list to add or change events


Via http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/interactive/2011/oct/18/occupy-protests-map-world