I’m right there with ya, Al. #badcopsnodoughnuts

I sure hope Daniel Chong

buys a lot of cannabis with some of that $4.1mil d.e.a. money.

#bad cops no doughnuts

vye-leviathan:

ritmossincopados-sonidosdemuerte:

A.C.A.B. around the world.

We are facing a crisis in the world, and sadly, it’s become the elephant in the room.

It was more sophisticated than we had imagined: new documents show that the violent crackdown on Occupy last fall – so mystifying at the time – was not just coordinated at the level of the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, and local police. The crackdown, which involved, as you may recall, violent arrests, group disruption, canister missiles to the skulls of protesters, people held in handcuffs so tight they were injured, people held in bondage till they were forced to wet or soil themselves –was coordinated with the big banks themselves.

The Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, in a groundbreaking scoop that should once more shame major US media outlets (why are nonprofits now some of the only entities in America left breaking major civil liberties news?), filed this request. The document – reproduced here in an easily searchable format – shows a terrifying network of coordinated DHS, FBI, police, regional fusion center, and private-sector activity so completely merged into one another that the monstrous whole is, in fact, one entity: in some cases, bearing a single name, the Domestic Security Alliance Council. And it reveals this merged entity to have one centrally planned, locally executed mission. The documents, in short, show the cops and DHS working for and with banks to target, arrest, and politically disable peaceful American citizens.

The documents, released after long delay in the week between Christmas and New Year, show a nationwide meta-plot unfolding in city after city in an Orwellian world: six American universities are sites where campus police funneled information about students involved with OWS to the FBI, with the administrations’ knowledge (p51); banks sat down with FBI officials to pool information about OWS protesters harvested by private security; plans to crush Occupy events, planned for a month down the road, were made by the FBI – and offered to the representatives of the same organizations that the protests would target; and even threats of the assassination of OWS leaders by sniper fire – by whom? Where? – now remain redacted and undisclosed to those American citizens in danger, contrary to standard FBI practice to inform the person concerned when there is a threat against a political leader (p61).

As Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, executive director of the PCJF, put it, the documents show that from the start, the FBI – though it acknowledges Occupy movement as being, in fact, a peaceful organization – nonetheless designated OWS repeatedly as a “terrorist threat”:

“FBI documents just obtained by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund (PCJF) … reveal that from its inception, the FBI treated the Occupy movement as a potential criminal and terrorist threat … The PCJF has obtained heavily redacted documents showing that FBI offices and agents around the country were in high gear conducting surveillance against the movement even as early as August 2011, a month prior to the establishment of the OWS encampment in Zuccotti Park and other Occupy actions around the country.” …

It was a more than typically murderous Saturday night in São Paulo: at 10pm, in the São Bernardo do Campo neighbourhood, a motorcyclist rode up to a private home, killed two of the residents, then sped away. An hour or so later in a nearby district, police shot and killed two men in what they said was an exchange of fire. Elsewhere police found the body of a man with a bullet through his brain – one of 14 people murdered and 12 injured in this single night amid a rising wave of violence in Brazil’s biggest city.

At least 140 people have been murdered in São Paulo over the past two weeks in an outbreak of violent crime that has prompted early school closures, a change of municipal bus routes and street demonstrations. In September 144 people were killed. The causes are manifold, but a major factor appears to be an undeclared war between the largest criminal militia and the police, which has led to drive-by shootings, ambushes and other killings.

After initially denying the link, officials from the public safety department told local newspapers at the weekend that many of the killings of police had been ordered by imprisoned leaders of the First Capital Command criminal group in reprisal for a crackdown on the drug trade.

Non-governmental organisations, however, say the responsibility also lies with militias formed by former and serving police officers, who are used to skimming profits off the drug trade. So far this year, 92 former and current police officers have been gunned down.

Last week state and federal police said they would combine forces to create a new intelligence agency to counter the resurgent threat posed by organised crime. …

New Zealand’s prime minister, John Key, has launched a inquiry into “unlawful” spying by government agents leading to the arrest of Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom, who is fighting extradition to the US where he faces charges of internet piracy and breaking copyright laws.

The investigation may deal another blow to the US case after a New Zealand court ruled in June that search warrants used in the raid on Dotcom’s home earlier this year, requested by the FBI, were illegal.

Key has asked the government’s intelligence and security division to investigate “circumstances of unlawful interception of communications of certain individuals by the government communications security bureau”, his office said in a statement on Monday.

Key’s spokesman would not comment on whether the “certain individuals” referred to Dotcom, his three colleagues also arrested and facing US charges, or all of them.

"The bureau had acquired communications in some instances without statutory authority," Key’s statement said. …

CCTV footage shows a police officer pushing a 14-year-old girl against a parked car and firing a taser at her groin. Shortly before the taser was fired the teenager is seen raising her hands in surrender. She received hospital treatment after the incident in Allentown, Pennsylvania

from Alexandra:
“Hi everyone my leg was grotesquely broken when cops attacked our peaceful protest in Rhode Island. The mainstream media (especially the Associated Press) has ignored these horrendous photographs that show the horrific injuries I suffered when the cops attacked. Please feel free to make these telling photos available to all your friends who value freedom and liberty”

 (via Police state - pseudopodia’s soup)

from Alexandra:
“Hi everyone my leg was grotesquely broken when cops attacked our peaceful protest in Rhode Island. The mainstream media (especially the Associated Press) has ignored these horrendous photographs that show the horrific injuries I suffered when the cops attacked. Please feel free to make these telling photos available to all your friends who value freedom and liberty”

(via Police state - pseudopodia’s soup)

Rupert Murdoch is flying to London after five of tabloid’s most senior staff are arrested in ongoing inquiry into alleged bribery


The Sun has been plunged into its worst ever crisis following the arrest of five of its most senior journalists over corruption allegations, moving Rupert Murdoch to pledge his support for the paper amid rumours that it faces closure.

Murdoch’s “total commitment” to continue to own and publish the Sun was sent to News International staff by chief executive Tom Mockridge after the journalists, who include the deputy editor, were arrested in connection with an investigation into inappropriate payments to police and public officials.

Mockridge confirmed that the five Sun journalists involved are deputy editor Geoff Webster, picture editor John Edwards, chief reporter John Kay, chief foreign correspondent Nick Parker and deputy news editor John Sturgis.

The Sun’s editor, Dominic Mohan, said: “I’m as shocked as anyone by today’s arrests but am determined to lead the Sun through these difficult times. I have a brilliant staff and we have a duty to serve our readers and will continue to do that. Our focus is on putting out Monday’s newspaper.”

A News International source said Mohan was “not resigning” but added that it was “obviously a dramatic day for him”.

Sky News reported that Murdoch is flying into the UK to reassure Sun staff that he will not close the paper in the wake of the latest arrests. Murdoch is expected to visit News International staff in London towards the end of next week.

In an email to News International staff, Mockridge said he “had a personal assurance today from Rupert Murdoch about his total commitment to continue to own and publish The Sun newspaper.”

He also called on staff to support Mohan at a time when the company was “facing our greatest challenge”. …

'Human error' led to addresses being placed in wrong field when sending survey to victims over standard of service

The role of the former Sun editor Rebekah Brooks is expected to come under fresh scrutiny after four of the paper’s current and former journalists were arrested on Saturday in connection with an investigation into corrupt payments to police.

Detectives with Operation Elveden, the Metropolitan Police’s investigation into illegal payments to officers, raided the Sun’s offices in Wapping, east London, morning after receiving information from News Corp, the parent company of News International, which owns the paper. A serving police officer in the Met’s Territorial Policing command was also arrested at his place of work and questioned at a police station.

In a statement, News Corp said: “Metropolitan Police Service officers from Operation Elveden arrested four current and former employees from the Sun newspaper. Searches have also taken place at the homes and offices of those arrested. News Corporation made a commitment last summer that unacceptable news gathering practices by individuals in the past would not be repeated.”

It is understood that staff and management at the Sun had no warning of the operation. The four Sun journalists arrested were Mike Sullivan, the paper’s crime editor; the former managing editor, Graham Dudman; an executive editor, Fergus Shanahan; and Chris Pharo, a news desk executive. They all worked under Brooks, who edited the Sun from January 2003 to September 2009, when she became chief executive of News International. …

Protesters trying to set up Occupy-style camp in front of St Peter’s removed with the support of the Holy See

…  “We put our faith in the Vatican but no one helped us,” Julian Garcia, one of the group, told Corriere della Sera. “We were sitting on the ground and they were hitting us with batons.”  …

 (via Vatican protesters evicted by police | World news | The Guardian)

Protesters trying to set up Occupy-style camp in front of St Peter’s removed with the support of the Holy See

… “We put our faith in the Vatican but no one helped us,” Julian Garcia, one of the group, told Corriere della Sera. “We were sitting on the ground and they were hitting us with batons.” …

(via Vatican protesters evicted by police | World news | The Guardian)

Plant was made to resemble a festive tree by growing it to 5ft tall and decorating it with brightly-coloured baubles

The bastards.
Y bastardiaid.
कमीनों.
Die Bastarde.
Bastardi.
Bu bastards.
Οι μπάσταρδοι.
Els fills de puta.
Gadovi.
De skiderikker.
Сволачы.
De klootzakken.
Värdjad.
Копелета.
A gazemberek.
Les bâtards.
Копилад.
Os bastardos.
Salo yo.
Bajingan-bajingan itu.
பாஸ்டர்ட்ஸ்.
I bastardi.
Сволоти.
De spuriis.
Den bastards.
Гадови.
Los hijos de puta.
De jävlarna.
Barabe.
놈들.
Nemernici.
Drani.
できそこない。
Mišrūnų.
Piçler.
混蛋。
HARAM.

The disappearance of Milly Dowler in March 2002 was a time of excruciating anguish for her family, as Surrey police hunted for clues to her fate. But according to detailed evidence now pieced together by the Guardian, the behaviour of the News of the World at the time helped neither the Dowlers nor the police.

A senior NoW executive, who later denied to a parliamentary committee all knowledge of illegality, wrote to Surrey police at the time specifically admitting Milly’s phone had been hacked.

The senior executive, who the Guardian is not yet naming for legal reasons, demanded on 20 April 2002 that police co-operate with the tabloid’s theory that Milly was still alive.

The theory, gleaned from a hacked message misunderstood by the paper, proved to be a waste of police time.

The NoW’s illegal conduct in hacking the missing 13-year-old’s phone in search of a scoop was so brazen that it led the police team to suspect the paper had also been further responsible for the mysterious deletion of a batch of Milly’s voicemails – a deletion on 24 March which had also given the Dowlers false hope their daughter was still alive.

Sources familiar with the Surrey investigation confirm that in April 2002, at the height of the search for Milly, a detective recorded specific police suspicion that the NoW was behind the voicemail deletion on the teenager’s phone. This appears to have been the origin of a Surrey police belief which surfaced again years later during a Met police inquiry into phone hacking and which featured in a Guardian article published this July.

That picture was confirmed on Tuesday by the family’s solicitor, Mark Lewis.

In a statement, he said of the Dowlers: “They have a clear recollection that the police told them that the News of the World had listened to their missing daughter’s voicemail and deleted some of the messages.” …