Sources: http://www.aflcio.org/Corporate-Watch/Paywatch-2014

http://www.aflcio.org/Corporate-Watch/Paywatch-Archive/CEO-Pay-and-You/CEO-to-Worker-Pay-Gap-in-the-United-States/Pay-Gaps-in-the-World

fUSION Anomalog. » Blog Archive » corporate motherfuckers…

… In a new blog post, Netflix explains that while transit networks like Level3 and Cogent help carry traffic to every network on the internet, Comcast isn’t performing that role. Comcast isn’t even helping Netflix move the traffic — according to Netflix — but simply acting as a gatekeeper for its own customers. Yet those customers are already theoretically paying Comcast for access to whatever internet content they request, including Netflix, no? “In this way, Comcast is double dipping by getting both its subscribers and Internet content providers to pay for access to each other,” argues Netflix VP of content Ken Florance.

Netflix also suggests that Comcast intentionally allowed its connections to existing transit providers like Cogent and Level3 to clog up in order to force the issue, but it’s not clear who is actually at fault. No one wants to pay to upgrade the pipes if they can pass the costs to someone else. …


Ta much, TheMadMinstrel!

… Koch Industry Gasoline:
Chevron
Union
Union 76
Conoco

Koch Industry/Invista Products:
COMFOREL® fiberfill
COOLMAX® fabric
CORDURA® fabric
DACRON® fiber
POLYSHIELD® resin
SOLARMAX® fabric
SOMERELLE® bedding products
STAINMASTER® carpet
SUPPLEX® fabric
TACTEL® fiber
TACTESSE® carpet fiber
TERATE® polyols
TERATHANE® polyether glycol
THERMOLITE® fabric
PHENREZ® resin
POLARGUARD® fiber and
LYCRA® fiber

Koch Industry/Georgia-Pacific Products:
Angel Soft toilet paper
Brawny paper towels
Dixie plates, bowls, napkins and cups
Mardi Gras napkins and towels
Quilted Northern toilet paper
Soft ‘n Gentle toilet paper
Sparkle napkins
Vanity fair napkins
Zee napkins

Georgia Pacific Building products:
Dense Armor Drywall and Decking
ToughArmor Gypsum board
Georgia pacific Plytanium Plywood
Flexrock
Densglass sheathing
G/P Industrial plasters (some products used by a lot of crafters)-
Agricultural Plaster
Arts & Crafts Plaster
Dental Plaster
General Purpose Plaster
Glass-reinforced Gypsum (GRG),etc.

"You don’t care and I don’t trust you."

NSA general counsel Rajesh De contradicts months of angry denials from big companies like Yahoo and Google

barrylyga:

American Internet speeds lag behind Estonia. ESTONIA. Let’s hear again how big cable mergers are good for consumers!

Albert Gifford, who spotted a grammatical error on a Tesco juice carton.

Schoolboy forces Tesco to change ungrammatical packaging
Albert Gifford wrote to Tesco over boast that orange juice is made with ‘most tastiest’ oranges

…  The schoolboy wrote: “I woke up one Thursday morning a few weeks ago thinking the day would be like any other.

"Sitting down for breakfast as usual, I picked up a carton of Tesco orange juice – and noticed it described itself as ‘most tastiest’. ‘Most tastiest’? Surely not? It could be ‘most tasty’ or simply ‘tastiest’, but never ‘most tastiest’.

"That’s just wrong, and I was so astonished, especially as Tesco is such a large company, that I almost started pouring the orange juice on to my Weetabix.

"My mum stopped me just in time, but when I told her about Tesco’s ‘most tastiest’ orange juice, she was just as surprised.

"I’ve since discovered that Tesco also describes its apple juice as the ‘most tastiest’, and, I suspect, its range of other juices, too."  …


Well done the lad!

Albert Gifford, who spotted a grammatical error on a Tesco juice carton.

Schoolboy forces Tesco to change ungrammatical packaging
Albert Gifford wrote to Tesco over boast that orange juice is made with ‘most tastiest’ oranges

… The schoolboy wrote: “I woke up one Thursday morning a few weeks ago thinking the day would be like any other.

"Sitting down for breakfast as usual, I picked up a carton of Tesco orange juice – and noticed it described itself as ‘most tastiest’. ‘Most tastiest’? Surely not? It could be ‘most tasty’ or simply ‘tastiest’, but never ‘most tastiest’.

"That’s just wrong, and I was so astonished, especially as Tesco is such a large company, that I almost started pouring the orange juice on to my Weetabix.

"My mum stopped me just in time, but when I told her about Tesco’s ‘most tastiest’ orange juice, she was just as surprised.

"I’ve since discovered that Tesco also describes its apple juice as the ‘most tastiest’, and, I suspect, its range of other juices, too." …


Well done the lad!

If the name TransCanada is familiar to you, it may be because they are the corporation behind the as yet unapproved KeystoneXL Pipeline. But the technology is safer than ever, they keep telling us! Yaright. From ThinkProgress.org:

A natural gas pipeline operated by TransCanada Corp. exploded and caught fire in the Canadian province of Manitoba on Saturday, shutting off gas supplies for as many as 4,000 residents in sub-zero temperatures.

“We could see these massive 200- to 300-meter high flames just shooting out of the ground and it literally sounded like a jet plane,” resident Paul Rawluk told the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.

…in order to repair the line, they shut off the natural gas supply to several municipalities.
Temperatures dropped to -20 degrees Celsius overnight.

Niverville Deputy Mayor John Funk said that “service is expected to be lost for minimum of 24 hours to multiple days” in a statement on the town’s website…

…a Wall Street Journal analysis released this week found that people discover pipeline spills far more often than the leak-detection technology touted by companies. Based on PHMSA data for 251 pipeline incidents over four years, the WSJ found that nearby residents or company employees were nearly three times as likely to detect a pipeline leak. Leak-detection software, special alarms and 24/7 control room monitoring, on the other hand, discovered leaks just 19.5 percent of the time. …

A crunchy, natural food company marketed to liberals discreetly sues to stop covering employees’ contraception

Cafe chain executive to face questions from MPs, while protesters plan to turn branches into creches and refuges

 (via Starbucks wakes up and smells the stench of tax avoidance controversy | Business | The Guardian)

Cafe chain executive to face questions from MPs, while protesters plan to turn branches into creches and refuges

(via Starbucks wakes up and smells the stench of tax avoidance controversy | Business | The Guardian)

Security firm issues ‘sincere apologies’ for treatment of stewards but insists it did not exploit workers

The former deputy prime minister Lord Prescott has written to the home secretary to complain about a security firm that used unpaid jobseekers to steward the Queen’s diamond jubilee celebrations in London.

He said he was “deeply concerned” by the revelations, published in the Guardian on Tuesday, that up to 30 unpaid jobseekers on the government’s work programme were asked to sleep under London Bridge before the river pageant on Sunday.

He is calling for Theresa May to investigate whether the company has broken the security industry’s own employment standards and is urging the government to review the company’s contract for the Olympics.

The firm, Close Protection UK (CPUK), has issued “sincere apologies” for what it called the “London Bridge incident”, but insisted that it had not been exploiting individuals but providing work experience.

Up to 30 jobseekers and another 50 people on apprentice wages were taken to London by coach from Bristol, Bath and Plymouth on Saturday before the pageant on Sunday as part of the government’s work programme.

Two jobseekers, who did not want to be identified in case they lost their benefits, later told the Guardian that they had to camp under London Bridge overnight, to change into security gear in public, had no access to toilets for 24 hours, and were taken to a swampy campsite outside London after working a 14-hour shift in the pouring rain on the banks of the Thames on Sunday.

In the letter, Prescott said the situation raised “very serious questions” about the “suitability of using private security contractors to do frontline policing instead of trained police officers” and that the company had shown a “blatant disregard for the care of its workers”.

He wrote: “It is totally unacceptable that young unemployed people were bussed in to London from Bristol, Bath and Plymouth and forced to sleep out in the cold overnight before stewarding a major event with no payment.

"I am deeply concerned that a private security firm is not only providing policing on the cheap but failing to show a duty of care to its staff and threatening to withdraw an opportunity to work at the Olympics as a means to coerce them to work unpaid." …

President Obama’s health reform law forced health insurance companies to largely stop canceling medical coverage to patients after being diagnosed with a disease. Rescissions, as they are known, allowed insurers to cancel individual market policies by finding spelling errors or minor mistakes in coverage applications as an excuse to halt treatment for patients.

An investigation found five health insurance companies operating in California had rescinded care for sick patients in over 20,000 instances. A congressional hearing following the study revealed cases in which people died after having vital health coverage rescinded. One of the health care companies that engaged in this practice, including in California, is UnitedHealth’s Golden Rule Insurance company.

Recently leaked document show that Golden Rule actually funneled large donations to a nonprofit “think tank” that fought aggressively to defend the right of insurance companies to engage in rescissions. The leaked documents, all relating to the fundraising operation of the Heartland Institute, have largely been covered by the media only through the lens of the group’s dedication to anti-climate science propaganda. But given the Heartland Institute’s lobbying against certain aspects of health reform, the Golden Rule donations are just as important.

Golden Rule gave $40,030 to the Heartland Institute in 2010, followed by a $250,000 donation last year and another $250,000 pledged for this year, according to the documents. The money is earmarked for the Heartland Institute’s health care policy program. …

Last year, Congress passed three trade deals with foreign countries — South Korea, Panama, and Colombia. Although these deals were referred to in mainstream political debate as “free trade” agreements, the truth is that all three agreements protected certain industries over others rather than completely drop trade barriers. The agreements, like past free trade pacts, also favor multinational corporation interests over those of workers and U.S. jobs and over protection of health, safety and the environment. …