Gender, schmender!

#THE GOD’S HONEST TRUTH

Gender, schmender!

#THE GOD’S HONEST TRUTH

Police notice, Tibet, 1993

Via wikipedja by way of dear Edosan

Police notice, Tibet, 1993

Via wikipedja by way of dear Edosan


… We all know by now that the NSA and the UK’s Government Communication Headquarters are reading our emails, listening to our phone conversations, storing our metadata and using our computers and phones to watch us. A bunch of dorky guys amassing huge collections of pictures of tits and dicks. Here they are, hard at work, protecting us:



I know I feel safer now! Happy viewing, guys! If we had any doubts before, now we know that the government doesn’t trust us – so very many of us – and we certainly don’t trust it. …


… Trading our privacy for the convenience of a Google search is not so different from giving up constitutionally protected freedoms in exchange for the “security” that our government claims to offer. At least with Google and other tech services we know we’re getting something; whether we actually are more secure because of the NSA’s surveillance is an unresolved question. We are frequently told that this indiscriminate data collection has produced valuable results, but those results are “secret,” so you’ll just have to trust the government. I’m not saying we don’t need strong security measures to protect us from lunatics, but this dragnet surveillance has gone way beyond meeting that need.


Cyber thieves, for their part, don’t offer the average internet user anything in return – not only that, but they make money selling information about the security gaps they find to the US government. It’s an open question whether the government actually wants to patch up those holes and make the internet more secure. For now, it’s in its interest to keep these holes open – available for future use, but secret. And we know how good the government is at keeping secrets.


To a lot of folks it appears that the corporations, the thieves and the government are all doing exactly the same thing: the “legal” behavior and the illegal theft are cousins. Spying and cyber theft are not freak phenomena; increasingly, they appear to be unavoidable consequences of online access as it now exists. …


NSA general counsel Rajesh De contradicts months of angry denials from big companies like Yahoo and Google

Reblog if you think it’s okay to be homosexual

andrysb24:

fumareta-hana:

fumareta-hana:

I need to prove a point to my homophobic friend.

I’m writing down the urls of everyone who reblogs this in a notebook, and will present it to my friend when it is sufficiently full.
image

You’re gonna need a bigger book

People who are obsessed with others’ private lives and what they do with their private parts are more than a little twisted. Gender, schmender!

Edward Snowden was clearly acting as a whistle-blower in revealing documentation of the NSA’s shocking dragnet that collects information about the phone calls, emails and other communications of virtually all Americans.

And yet the government has thus far chosen to prosecute him for criminal violations of the Espionage Act and will likely seek a life sentence once Snowden is in custody.

Rick Ledgett, the hand-picked head of the White House’s task force on the NSA has said that he could support amnesty if Snowden would stop any additional leaks. And former high-ranking State Department official Anne-Marie Slaughter announced her support for the New York Times editorial board’s call for clemency.

“When someone reveals that government officials have routinely and deliberately broken the law, that person should not face life in prison at the hands of the same government,” writes the Times. And as the editorial notes, for Snowden there was no other recourse that would have brought the NSA’s abuses to light.

The White House and its Department of Justice can ensure that in the wake of the constitutional crisis brought to light by Snowden, our constitutional rights are restored and the NSA is reformed. The president, White House officials, attorney general and Department of Justice staff should read this editorial, and summon up the courage to take action.  …

Ta much, dear Edosan!

Ta much, dear Edosan!

Teenage girl shot by Taliban in Pakistan says pens and books are weapons to defeat terrorism, in seven-minute speech

We stand with citizens across Russia who are calling on their government to stop the crackdown against lesbian, gay, bi and trans people that is fuelling anti-gay violence.

We urge leaders around the world and within Russia to work to eliminate all anti-gay laws and protect all citizens from violence and discrimination in Russia.

 (via The anti-gay Olympics? - All Out)

We stand with citizens across Russia who are calling on their government to stop the crackdown against lesbian, gay, bi and trans people that is fuelling anti-gay violence.

We urge leaders around the world and within Russia to work to eliminate all anti-gay laws and protect all citizens from violence and discrimination in Russia.

(via The anti-gay Olympics? - All Out)

… “I am honoured to be part of the opening,” she said. “The content of a book holds the power of education and it is with this power that we can shape our future and change lives. There is no greater weapon than knowledge and no greater source of knowledge than the written word.

"It is my dream that one day, great buildings like this one will exist in every corner of the world so every child can grow up with the opportunity to succeed." …

Newspapers urge prime minister to restore Britain’s reputation for free press after holding of Guardian journalist’s partner

The National Security Agency paid millions of dollars to cover the costs of major internet companies involved in the Prism surveillance program after a court ruled that some of the agency’s activities were unconstitutional, according to top-secret material passed to the Guardian.

The technology companies, which the NSA says includes Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Facebook, incurred the costs to meet new certification demands in the wake of the ruling from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance (Fisa) court.

The October 2011 judgment, which was declassified on Wednesday by the Obama administration, found that the NSA’s inability to separate purely domestic communications from foreign traffic violated the fourth amendment.

While the ruling did not concern the Prism program directly, documents passed to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden describe the problems the decision created for the agency and the efforts required to bring operations into compliance. The material provides the first evidence of a financial relationship between the tech companies and the NSA.

The intelligence agency requires the Fisa court to sign annual “certifications” that provide the legal framework for surveillance operations. But in the wake of the court judgment these were only being renewed on a temporary basis while the agency worked on a solution to the processes that had been ruled illegal. …

The NSA whistleblower says: ‘I have never spoken with, worked with, or provided any journalistic materials to the Independent’

officalnsa:

ur funny but ur also go to jail

officalnsa:

ur funny but ur also go to jail