researchnotesuk:

Source - Deutsche Welle

Extracts

DW: So that’s what it’s all about, expanding the budget for the intelligence community?

Binney : If you have a problem, you need money to solve it. But if you solve that problem, you no longer have the justification to get money. That’s the way they view it - keep the problem going, so the money keeps flowing. Once you build up this big empire, you have to sustain it. … Look at the influence and power the intelligence community has over the government. They [the government] are giving them everything they want, they’re trying to cover up all their tracks and their crimes. Look at the influence and power they’re gaining.

DW: As someone who was instrumental in designing the NSA’s programs, do you sometimes feel like the man who invented the atom bomb?

Binney : No, because I designed it to do a proper job. These people subverted it. They corrupted it to violate the law and the constitution. The design I did followed all that … and I was open with Congress about what I was doing. … These cowards downtown in DC are changing our constitution - they’re scrapping the First, Fourth, and Fifth Amendments primarily. If you want to change the constitution, there’s a process to do that. That process means putting a proposal in Congress, get Congress to pass it and then you pass it around all the states, and if 75 percent of the states ratify it, then it’s a Constitutional Amendment. That’s the process. These cowards are doing it all in secret.

Capitalism is all about power and money: naturally all its trappings & tentacles are too.

Bold. Landmark. Sweeping. Those were the words experts on all sides used Wednesday to describe the U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling that police must obtain a warrant before searching a cellphone at the time of an arrest.

The decision came in two cases where law enforcement used information obtained from a cellphone without a warrant to win a conviction.

Writing for the unanimous court, Chief Justice John Roberts said that the answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cellphone at the time of an arrest is “simple — get a warrant.”

One of the seeds of the American Revolution, he noted, was the “general warrant” used by the British to rummage through colonists’ papers and belongings. To ensure that such searches would not happen in the new republic, the founders adopted the Fourth Amendment ban on unreasonable searches, and the general rule adopted by the courts has been that a search is not reasonable unless police obtain a warrant. …

… It is also not certain what the decision’s implications are for the government’s collection of other data for national security purposes. The court’s opinion has hints both ways. Eckenwiler pointed to a footnote that seems to exclude such information from the reach of Wednesday’s opinion.

But Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, has a different view. “The opinion will have some bearing in the cases that are being litigated around the NSA’s bulk record collection program,” he anticipated.

The Wednesday opinion in two cases coupled with a 2012 decision, however, sent a strong message about how the Supreme Court is interpreting the 1789 Constitution in the modern digital world.

In that 2012 decision, the court — again unanimously — ruled that police cannot put a GPS tracking device on a suspect’s car without a warrant. Looking at this trio of cases, George Washington’s Kerr notes that makes “27 votes for the defense and zero for the government when the court is applying the Fourth Amendment to new technology.” That trend, Kerr said, is “very surprising.”

Yesterday I brought the story of John Napier Tye to Dailykos but it scrolled off rather quickly so I thought I would have another go, adding this bonus article from the Atlantic on the story. But first, a quick recap:

In the July 18th Edition of the Washington Post John Napier Tye, the State Departments former Section Chief on Internet Freedom in the departments Bureau of Human Rights and Labor posted an important op-ed concerned that the Reagan era executive order poses a direct risk to our democracy. While this is not surprising to those of us who have followed the NSA’s success at narrowing the discussion down to various Patriot Act sections, it is important that someone of such credentials is bringing the discussion to the public.

"From 2011 until April of this year, I worked on global Internet freedom policy as a civil servant at the State Department. In that capacity, I was cleared to receive top-secret and “sensitive compartmented” information. Based in part on classified facts that I am prohibited by law from publishing, I believe that Americans should be even more concerned about the collection and storage of their communications under Executive Order 12333 than under Section 215." …

We’re all potential terrorists now!

If you didn’t give two sh*ts™ about our country’s surveillance state, you may just change your mind after reading The Intercept’s latest piece, just published over the past few hours.

Guilty until proven innocent: “irrefutable facts” and “concrete evidence” are no longer required to place U.S. citizens on a terrorist watch list under the new guidelines of the administration’s early-2013 expansion of our surveillance state. (And, good luck getting yourself removed from it once you’re on it!)

Our country’s Orwellian realities just get more outrageous by the minute…

Documents leaked by Edward Snowden reveal programs to track targets, spread information and manipulate online debates

The UK intelligence agency GCHQ has developed sophisticated tools to manipulate online polls, spam targets with SMS messages, track people by impersonating spammers and monitor social media postings, according to newly-published documents leaked by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The documents – which were published on First Look Media with accompanying analysis from Glenn Greenwald – disclose a range of GCHQ “effects” programs aimed at tracking targets, spreading information, and manipulating online debates and statistics.

The disclosure comes the day before the UK parliament is due to begin up to three days’ debate on emergency legislation governing British surveillance capabilities. With cross-party support the bill is expected to be voted through this week.

Among the programs revealed in the document are:

• GATEWAY: the “ability to artificially increase traffic to a website”.

• CLEAN SWEEP which “masquerade[s] Facebook wall posts for individuals or entire countries”.

• SCRAPHEAP CHALLENGE for “perfect spoofing of emails from BlackBerry targets”.

• UNDERPASS to “change outcome of online polls”.

• SPRING BISHOP to find “private photos of targets on Facebook”.

The document also details a range of programs designed to collect and store public postings from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+, and to make automated postings on several of the social networks.

Capabilities to boost views of YouTube videos, or to boost the circulation of particular messages are also detailed. …

NSA data shows that 90 percent of people surveilled are innocent Americans whom the agency is legally prohibited from spying upon. Cory Doctorow looks at what the NSA means when it says “targeted.”


#spy crap #fuck the nsa

Information Commissioner’s Office reported to be looking into study in which postings for 700,000 users were secretly altered

Facebook is being investigated to assess whether an experiment in which it manipulated users’ news feeds to study the effect it had on moods might have broken data protection laws, it has been reported.

The Information Commissioner’s Office is said to be looking into the experiment carried out by the social network and two US universities in which almost 700,000 users had their news feeds secretly altered to study the impact of “emotional contagion”.

The ICO said it was too early to tell what part of the law Facebook might have infringed, the Financial Times reported. …

… Many users reacted angrily following online reports of the findings, which were published in the 17 June edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Some referred to it as “creepy”, “evil”, “terrifying” and “super disturbing”. …

digitaldiscipline:

aphchuugoku:

rebel-vargas:

aph-lovelies:

hella-of-hella:

stuckonprospit:

miraakthesecond:

ask-pigpeter:

karliemornis:

yourgaytailor:

amatory-milksop:

tsundere-saurus-rex:

stoneagechronicles:

punkqueer:

TAKE ACTION

Post to your Facebook & Twitter: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/2594-july-4th-protest-nsa-spying

Protest on July 4th: http://www.RestoreTheFourth.net

Find out about other actions: http://CallForFreedom.org

Not normally this blog’s topic, but this needs to be spread like crazy. Internet privacy is a big fucking deal, and 83 notes on this as I reblog this is pathetic.

If you dont reblog this, I will judge you so hard

I hope they have fun seeing all of my porn.

Hope they like gay fanfictions 

hope they like gay homestuck porn

NSA, if you like my posts, there’s a follow button in the corner….

hope they like hentai, gay hentai, clop, gay clop, RP’s ERP’s and more

I hope they like gay fanfiction and homestuck

I hope you ship jeanmarco 

I hope you ship personified nations

I hope you ship lesbian assassins

I hope you like gay nations.

Look, I’m as down on government surveillance as anyone, and probably moreso, but… tumblr posts ain’t private (that’s kind of the point of posting them). Likes aren’t necessarily private, either - some folks have theirs visible to followers and non-followers alike.

Messages getting read? Yeah, that’s shifty.

Do yourself a favor in advance of the Fourth - install an extension like HTTPS Everywhere to at least visit the secure/encrypted versions of every site you go to that supports it (note: this does cause some fuckery with LiveJournal commenting)

If you don’t have tumblr tied to a generic or throwaway email account - even if it’s a Yahoo one - it’s not a bad idea.

Privacy online is an endangered species, but there’s a little bit you can do for yourselves even if you don’t want to be bothered trying to go deep in the weeds.

And telling the NSA to go fuck itself with the 4th Amendment is a fine thing to do.

#Fuck the nsa

The Privacy Pack

resetthenet:

The Reset the Net privacy pack will be a selection of software and tips tailored to common computers, phones, and tablets that literally anyone can use.

Our goal is to accommodate literally everyone, and offer bonus tools and instructions for more technical users. Since the tools will be pretty much universal, it should be easy for people to share the privacy packs with friends.

It’ll provide tools and tips for iPhone, Android, Mac, Windows, and GNU/Linux, and everything will be free software.

Here’s what we’re offering…

Read More

#fuck the nsa

The US intelligence whistleblower Edward Snowden has warned that entire populations, rather than just individuals, now live under constant surveillance.

“It’s no longer based on the traditional practice of targeted taps based on some individual suspicion of wrongdoing,” he said. “It covers phone calls, emails, texts, search history, what you buy, who your friends are, where you go, who you love.”

Snowden made his comments in a short video that was played before a debate on the proposition that surveillance today is a euphemism for mass surveillance, in Toronto, Canada. The former US National Security Agency contractor is living in Russia, having been granted temporary asylum there in June 2013.

The video was shown as two of the debaters – the former US National Security Administration director, General Michael Hayden, and the well-known civil liberties lawyer and Harvard law professor, Alan Dershowitz – argued in favour of the debate statement: “Be it resolved state surveillance is a legitimate defence of our freedoms.”

Opposing the motion were Glenn Greenwald, the journalist whose work based on Snowden’s leaks won a Pulitzer Prize for the Guardian last month, and Alexis Ohanian, co-founder of the social media website Reddit.

The Snowden documents, first leaked to the Guardian last June, revealed that the US government has programs in place to spy on hundreds of millions of people’s emails, social networking posts, online chat histories, browsing histories, telephone records, telephone calls and texts – “nearly everything a typical user does on the internet”, in the words of one leaked document.

Greenwald opened the debate by condemning the NSA’s own slogan, which he said appears repeatedly throughout its own documents: “Collect it all.” …

zimpirate:

bigbigbigday006:

strangelyobsessedwithstuff:

void-the-sinner:

spoiledbabe:

hazelandglasz:

durnesque-esque:

thehippiejew:

extrafeisty:

jaycubs:


A Glasgow nightclub has installed a two-way mirror which allows male revellers in private booths to spy on unsuspecting women as they visit the toilet! With no notification or signage anywhere in the venue many female club goers have been left feeling embarrassed and used. Although they do briefly show the mirrors in a promo video, the club has been quickly deleting comments and posts on their social media from club goers trying to alert others to the situation. This is pretty much illegal and hugley violates privacy. Thank you The Shimmy Club for giving us a shiny, new, creative and cool take on objectification. article here

i’m never leaving my house again, this world is just too fucked up.

WHAT!?

gross gross gross gross gross

Good morning disgusting. Remember ladies:
 “No space, leave the place” (fingernail test)
A two way mirror must be set INTO the wall, not placed on top of it.
If you rap/knock against the mirror, one installed onto a wall (a normal mirror) will make a dull sound, because there’s something behind it. A two-way will have more reverberation.
Use the flashlight on your phone to shine on the mirror, if it’s a two-way, you’ll be able to see into the other room.
You can also shield your eyes and see in if you lean up against the glass.
The room being viewed will have to be brightly lit (10x brighter than the room looking in), so if you’re in a typical dimly lit club bathroom, you’re ok.

boosting the fuck out of this

They have this in Continental Midtown in Philly, it’s fucking creepy and not cool at all

the most obvious solution i can think of is to break that motherfucker. what are they going to do? sue you for breaking something they shouldnt have had?

That’s fucking disgusting.

Hey, fellas. You ever feel like you have to check if you’re standing in front of a two-way mirror? Women do.

This needs to be known


Bottle the mirror and that evil git before it.

zimpirate:

bigbigbigday006:

strangelyobsessedwithstuff:

void-the-sinner:

spoiledbabe:

hazelandglasz:

durnesque-esque:

thehippiejew:

extrafeisty:

jaycubs:

A Glasgow nightclub has installed a two-way mirror which allows male revellers in private booths to spy on unsuspecting women as they visit the toilet! With no notification or signage anywhere in the venue many female club goers have been left feeling embarrassed and used. Although they do briefly show the mirrors in a promo video, the club has been quickly deleting comments and posts on their social media from club goers trying to alert others to the situation. This is pretty much illegal and hugley violates privacy. Thank you The Shimmy Club for giving us a shiny, new, creative and cool take on objectification.
article here

i’m never leaving my house again, this world is just too fucked up.

WHAT!?

gross gross gross gross gross

Good morning disgusting.

Remember ladies:

  • “No space, leave the place” (fingernail test)
  • A two way mirror must be set INTO the wall, not placed on top of it.
  • If you rap/knock against the mirror, one installed onto a wall (a normal mirror) will make a dull sound, because there’s something behind it. A two-way will have more reverberation.
  • Use the flashlight on your phone to shine on the mirror, if it’s a two-way, you’ll be able to see into the other room.
  • You can also shield your eyes and see in if you lean up against the glass.
  • The room being viewed will have to be brightly lit (10x brighter than the room looking in), so if you’re in a typical dimly lit club bathroom, you’re ok.

boosting the fuck out of this

They have this in Continental Midtown in Philly, it’s fucking creepy and not cool at all

the most obvious solution i can think of is to break that motherfucker. what are they going to do? sue you for breaking something they shouldnt have had?

That’s fucking disgusting.

Hey, fellas. You ever feel like you have to check if you’re standing in front of a two-way mirror? Women do.

This needs to be known

Bottle the mirror and that evil git before it.


… We all know by now that the NSA and the UK’s Government Communication Headquarters are reading our emails, listening to our phone conversations, storing our metadata and using our computers and phones to watch us. A bunch of dorky guys amassing huge collections of pictures of tits and dicks. Here they are, hard at work, protecting us:



I know I feel safer now! Happy viewing, guys! If we had any doubts before, now we know that the government doesn’t trust us – so very many of us – and we certainly don’t trust it. …


… Trading our privacy for the convenience of a Google search is not so different from giving up constitutionally protected freedoms in exchange for the “security” that our government claims to offer. At least with Google and other tech services we know we’re getting something; whether we actually are more secure because of the NSA’s surveillance is an unresolved question. We are frequently told that this indiscriminate data collection has produced valuable results, but those results are “secret,” so you’ll just have to trust the government. I’m not saying we don’t need strong security measures to protect us from lunatics, but this dragnet surveillance has gone way beyond meeting that need.


Cyber thieves, for their part, don’t offer the average internet user anything in return – not only that, but they make money selling information about the security gaps they find to the US government. It’s an open question whether the government actually wants to patch up those holes and make the internet more secure. For now, it’s in its interest to keep these holes open – available for future use, but secret. And we know how good the government is at keeping secrets.


To a lot of folks it appears that the corporations, the thieves and the government are all doing exactly the same thing: the “legal” behavior and the illegal theft are cousins. Spying and cyber theft are not freak phenomena; increasingly, they appear to be unavoidable consequences of online access as it now exists. …


NSA general counsel Rajesh De contradicts months of angry denials from big companies like Yahoo and Google

Reblog if you think it’s okay to be homosexual

andrysb24:

fumareta-hana:

fumareta-hana:

I need to prove a point to my homophobic friend.

I’m writing down the urls of everyone who reblogs this in a notebook, and will present it to my friend when it is sufficiently full.
image

You’re gonna need a bigger book

People who are obsessed with others’ private lives and what they do with their private parts are more than a little twisted. Gender, schmender!

Edward Snowden was clearly acting as a whistle-blower in revealing documentation of the NSA’s shocking dragnet that collects information about the phone calls, emails and other communications of virtually all Americans.

And yet the government has thus far chosen to prosecute him for criminal violations of the Espionage Act and will likely seek a life sentence once Snowden is in custody.

Rick Ledgett, the hand-picked head of the White House’s task force on the NSA has said that he could support amnesty if Snowden would stop any additional leaks. And former high-ranking State Department official Anne-Marie Slaughter announced her support for the New York Times editorial board’s call for clemency.

“When someone reveals that government officials have routinely and deliberately broken the law, that person should not face life in prison at the hands of the same government,” writes the Times. And as the editorial notes, for Snowden there was no other recourse that would have brought the NSA’s abuses to light.

The White House and its Department of Justice can ensure that in the wake of the constitutional crisis brought to light by Snowden, our constitutional rights are restored and the NSA is reformed. The president, White House officials, attorney general and Department of Justice staff should read this editorial, and summon up the courage to take action.  …